awards 2017/ Lieutenant Governor’s remarks

Lieutenant Governor’s remarks National Ethnic Press and Media Council of Canada Awards November 17, 2017 Check against delivery Let me begin by acknowledging Toronto as a sacred gathering place for the many Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island. I recognize the …

Lieutenant Governor’s remarks
National Ethnic Press and Media Council of Canada Awards
November 17, 2017

Check against delivery

Let me begin by acknowledging Toronto as a sacred gathering place for the many Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island. I recognize the enduring presence of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples in Ontario, and pay tribute in particular to the Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation.

Thank you for the invitation to again join you for the presentation of the National Ethnic Press and Media Council of Canada Awards.

And what a fitting place for this ceremony, City Hall, the centre of a city in which more than 140 languages are spoken, representing more than 200 distinct, self-reported ethnic origins.

This is a challenging time for the media: the way we communicate and consume information is changing. For many publications, simply having survived another year is cause for celebration.

That the organizations represented here tonight have persevered, despite the difficulties, demonstrates just how important and needed your work is. In the era of “fake news” communities turn to you for information, reporting, and analysis they can trust. The media can
play an essential role in strengthening and shaping a productive relationship between readers and their communities.

Tonight, I’d like to highlight three aspects of the ongoing importance the ethnic press continues to have for Canada.

First, Canadians are committed to good governance: Good governance is supported and driven by an engaged and informed population, served by media that is dedicated to the highest ideals of professional journalism.

Second, we are an outward-looking country. Ties that you maintain and strengthen with other countries and wide diasporas help all Canadians understand how we can contribute to, and learn from, the world beyond our borders.

And third, we are committed to social inclusion. You knit your communities together, connecting them to all Canadians, granting us a broader and deeper knowledge of each other’s cultures and stories.

Members of the National Ethnic Press and Media Council of Canada embody the ideal of the multicultural mosaic, speaking out from different points of view. Together, you create not an echo chamber, where we only hear voices similar to our own, but a productive, harmonious counterpoint that is intercultural dialogue.

The agreement you have recently reached with the National NewsMedia Council of Canada will no doubt enhance that dialogue. I look forward to seeing how your organizations will work together to build bridges between the broader community and your readers.

My thanks to Mr. Saras and council members for bringing such a range of voices together over many years.

And my warm congratulations to tonight’s award recipients. To the journalists: I applaud your courage and commitment to telling stories that need to be told. Please keep up your important work.

To the distinguished service recipients: I commend you for being leaders in promoting social justice, cultural understanding, and diversity. May these awards cause others to follow your example.

Together, you are all helping to strengthen the social bonds that will sustain us as we look ahead to the next 150 years.

Have a lovely evening. Thank you. Merci. Miigwetch.